Posted on by NutriKane D

The concepts of “food as medicine” and “lifestyle medicine” are once again starting to achieve the recognition they deserve, not just with the public, but in the medical community as well. Many medical centres now have dieticians on board and metabolic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension have long been understood to require food and exercise changes as a part of their treatment. Directed or medical, nutrition is the logical next step in this pathway. With directed nutrition, it is realised that telling people to simply eat better is not enough, rather we take the huge body of science around the dietary requirements for various conditions, find foods that are known to meet these requirements, prepare the foods in such a way that the nutrition is present and determine when and how much of the foods to eat to see a benefit. This is very different to taking vitamins or supplements for a few reasons.

Firstly, vitamins and fibre supplements and other herbal mixtures are not properly targeted to a specific condition and often don’t have direct science to back them up. Rather, they take a general scientific principle and apply it to vague concepts of wellbeing – for example everybody needs fibre in their diet and most people are lacking therefore taking a fibre supplement is better than not taking one. However, once you get to specifics the system breaks down; taking 30g of certain fibres a day helps manage blood glucose but nobody takes that much, so it isn’t right to stick “manages blood glucose” on your product. With directed nutrition, the testing is done on the dose that is recommended to prove that it works.

Secondly, nutrition is an incredibly complicated process. Your body absorbs hundreds if not thousands of things from your foods and for the most part vitamins and supplements are simply not complex enough to get the job done. The way to think of it is that your body is a sound board with hundreds of dials trying to make complex music. Now if one dial is completely out of whack, then you need a harsh force to get it back into place (a medicine). However, if 50 dials are out by 5% you still have terrible music. This is where directed nutrition comes in; the two work together to make people well. Only adjusting 3 of the dials (with a supplement) might help a little bit but it just isn’t going to get the job done.  From the other side, being told “eat well” just randomly fiddles with switches – it might help but it might not. Couple that with the fact that the food that you buy can have wildly different levels of nutrients based on where it was grown and how long it has been stored or how it was prepared, and it is very hard to get what you need without help.

So how does NutriKane specifically help with improving intestinal health and blood glucose management? Well being a complex food, it works in dozens of ways together, but these can be grouped into 3 basic effects – 1) the insoluble fibre physically stimulates the gastrointestinal  tract; 2) the micronutrients in the foods directly deal with nutritional deficiencies in our bodies and; 3) the broad spectrum prebiotic nature of the foods feeds our good bacteria which in turn provides us with essential nutrition in its own right. These three mechanisms then help us by lowering the glycaemic index of foods, reducing inflammation, and allowing our metabolisms to function the way they should. Next time we will cover these in more detail.